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Google expands APIs to import other apps’ data

Google this week began offering APIs to help the flow of data between users’ apps and those Google offers.

APIs introduced include Sheets, for programmatic access to features users can add to a Google Sheets spreadsheet, and Slides, for exporting business data from apps to provide content and visuals for Google Slides slide decks. The Classroom API, launched last year, has added coursework endpoints for developers to sync grades and assignment data between the Google Classroom tool and applications.

The Sheets API offers programmatic access to Sheets Web and mobile interfaces, including pivot tables and charts. “For example, developers can use Sheets as part of a rich workflow that pushes data from their app into Sheets and allows users to collaborate on that data before the updated data is pulled back into the original app, removing altogether the need to copy and paste,” said Tom Holman, Google Sheets product manager. The API is available today. Documentation for Google Sheets is on Google’s developer site.

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IDG Contributor Network: Elastic cloud apps are great, but how do we protect the containers that power them?

Increasingly, organizations are recognizing—and taking advantage of—the benefits of cloud-based apps.

The compute, storage and I/O cloud infrastructure is dynamic, allowing for new virtual resources to be created and made available to the application at a moment’s notice. Also, each cloud application is componentized into a number of container functional units that can be added, deleted or changed as needed.

This latter point is the buzz of our industry—containerization.

As we march into a world of dynamic containerized applications, however, we need to keep in mind that there are subtle differences between them and their static virtual machine (VM) predecessors.

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With iPad Pro’s Power, Apps May Not Need a Cloud Back End

Mobile devices grow only more capable and computerlike in their abilities — the iPad Pro announced last week by Apple is a great example of that trend. Yet many mobile developers look to pair public cloud services with mobile devices, offloading the workloads to back-end servers.

That does not seem quite right, given the impressive processing and storage power of mobile devices.

If processing occurs on back-end cloud servers, you must have connectivity to that cloud, and information must be transmitted back and forth to the device. For some mobile applications that share data, back-end storage is a requirement. However, there are mobile applications that don’t need to share data, and such apps may find that processing and storage on the local mobile device provides a clear performance advantage.

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