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Researchers map out Netflix’s servers across the globe

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Netflix delivers a lot of video. Now researchers from Queen Mary University of London have mapped out where the servers that send out all of that data are located. 

A map of where the study found Netflix servers.

A map of where the study found Netflix servers.

Image:  Queen Mary University of London 

Last year, the video streaming giant made up 37 percent of internet traffic (with similar numbers over the past few years), but it’s been (sort of) unclear as to how it delivered that traffic so efficiently. 

Five researchers from QMUL’s School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science attempted to figure it out by loading Netflix videos on university computers, localizing the requests to different regions with a browser extension, and then studying the traffic delivered by servers in those areas.  Read more…

More about International, Servers, Netflix, and Tech


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Researchers stored an OK Go music video on strands of DNA

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Researchers just figured out how to squeeze 200 MB of data onto some strands of DNA.

That’s right, the same stuff that’s inside all of us, the blueprints for our eye color, ear shape, height and more — all that makes you, you — also happens to be a pretty decent medium for storing the same kind of information you put on a traditional USB memory stick.

Microsoft and the University of Washington announced the storage breakthrough on Thursday, reporting that they had managed to store a 2010, high definition OK Go music video (see below) as well as 100 books and Crop Trust’s seed database on some DNA strands. Storing data on synthetic DNA is not new, but 200 MB is a huge leap from the most recent DNA storage record of just 22 MB. Read more…

More about Microsoft, Storage, Science, Data, and Dna


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Amazon Cloud, Analytics Help Researchers Fight Famine

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Researchers in the US and China explore rice genomes with AWS analytics tools to develop drought and disease resistant crops.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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